html текст
All interests
  • All interests
  • Design
  • Food
  • Gadgets
  • Humor
  • News
  • Photo
  • Travel
  • Video
Click to see the next recommended page
Like it
Don't like
Add to Favorites
Ruby Rumie: HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Gallery. On view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014

What’s the first step in coping with a stressful or anxious experience? Breathing deeply.
The act is therapeutic. Inhale, then exhale, and a natural calm creeps in. Nerves settle down. Clear-headedness pervades. But just how powerful is this seemingly casual exercise? Artist Ruby Rumié would say incredibly so—so powerful, in fact, that she used the technique to help 100 Colombian women overcome the pain of domestic abuse, encouraging them to release their suffering into ceramic pots. (Time for a deep breath.) Her moving exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Galleryis on view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014.
The women, who range in age from 18 to 72, all have two things in common: they hail from Rumié’s native Cartagena de Indias, Columbia, and they’ve suffered greatly at the hands of callous men. Nothing can reverse a betrayal so intimate as domestic abuse. Nothing can undo it. But through art and personal reflection, Rumié aims to help these women heal and rise above. She crafted 100 white ceramic pots, one for each chosen victim, and in a series of communal exercizes—involving discussion circles and therapy—had them channel all the angst and dark emotions surrounding their abuse—pain, fear, regret, shame, distrust—and “exhale” them into the vessels. What were once simple clay pots suddenly become prisons for pain, and, in turn, liberation for former victims. “Divine breath,” indeed.
Once sealed and marked with each participants initials, the pots aided the women in letting go of the internal burdens associated with their suffering. Upon completion, each woman recieved a trinket female figurine of their choosing, made using traditional lost-wax methods.
32 of the charged pots are displayed during Rumié’s exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH, ornamented with intricate, golden metal designs that reflect the women whose pain they contain. A reception will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 9, from 6-8 p.m.
The beauty of the pots is undeniable. More beautiful yet is the personal healing that they helped bring about.
via
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
Ruby Rumie: HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Gallery. On view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014

What’s the first step in coping with a stressful or anxious experience? Breathing deeply.
The act is therapeutic. Inhale, then exhale, and a natural calm creeps in. Nerves settle down. Clear-headedness pervades. But just how powerful is this seemingly casual exercise? Artist Ruby Rumié would say incredibly so—so powerful, in fact, that she used the technique to help 100 Colombian women overcome the pain of domestic abuse, encouraging them to release their suffering into ceramic pots. (Time for a deep breath.) Her moving exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Galleryis on view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014.
The women, who range in age from 18 to 72, all have two things in common: they hail from Rumié’s native Cartagena de Indias, Columbia, and they’ve suffered greatly at the hands of callous men. Nothing can reverse a betrayal so intimate as domestic abuse. Nothing can undo it. But through art and personal reflection, Rumié aims to help these women heal and rise above. She crafted 100 white ceramic pots, one for each chosen victim, and in a series of communal exercizes—involving discussion circles and therapy—had them channel all the angst and dark emotions surrounding their abuse—pain, fear, regret, shame, distrust—and “exhale” them into the vessels. What were once simple clay pots suddenly become prisons for pain, and, in turn, liberation for former victims. “Divine breath,” indeed.
Once sealed and marked with each participants initials, the pots aided the women in letting go of the internal burdens associated with their suffering. Upon completion, each woman recieved a trinket female figurine of their choosing, made using traditional lost-wax methods.
32 of the charged pots are displayed during Rumié’s exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH, ornamented with intricate, golden metal designs that reflect the women whose pain they contain. A reception will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 9, from 6-8 p.m.
The beauty of the pots is undeniable. More beautiful yet is the personal healing that they helped bring about.
via
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
Ruby Rumie: HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Gallery. On view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014

What’s the first step in coping with a stressful or anxious experience? Breathing deeply.
The act is therapeutic. Inhale, then exhale, and a natural calm creeps in. Nerves settle down. Clear-headedness pervades. But just how powerful is this seemingly casual exercise? Artist Ruby Rumié would say incredibly so—so powerful, in fact, that she used the technique to help 100 Colombian women overcome the pain of domestic abuse, encouraging them to release their suffering into ceramic pots. (Time for a deep breath.) Her moving exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Galleryis on view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014.
The women, who range in age from 18 to 72, all have two things in common: they hail from Rumié’s native Cartagena de Indias, Columbia, and they’ve suffered greatly at the hands of callous men. Nothing can reverse a betrayal so intimate as domestic abuse. Nothing can undo it. But through art and personal reflection, Rumié aims to help these women heal and rise above. She crafted 100 white ceramic pots, one for each chosen victim, and in a series of communal exercizes—involving discussion circles and therapy—had them channel all the angst and dark emotions surrounding their abuse—pain, fear, regret, shame, distrust—and “exhale” them into the vessels. What were once simple clay pots suddenly become prisons for pain, and, in turn, liberation for former victims. “Divine breath,” indeed.
Once sealed and marked with each participants initials, the pots aided the women in letting go of the internal burdens associated with their suffering. Upon completion, each woman recieved a trinket female figurine of their choosing, made using traditional lost-wax methods.
32 of the charged pots are displayed during Rumié’s exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH, ornamented with intricate, golden metal designs that reflect the women whose pain they contain. A reception will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 9, from 6-8 p.m.
The beauty of the pots is undeniable. More beautiful yet is the personal healing that they helped bring about.
via
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
Ruby Rumie: HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Gallery. On view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014

What’s the first step in coping with a stressful or anxious experience? Breathing deeply.
The act is therapeutic. Inhale, then exhale, and a natural calm creeps in. Nerves settle down. Clear-headedness pervades. But just how powerful is this seemingly casual exercise? Artist Ruby Rumié would say incredibly so—so powerful, in fact, that she used the technique to help 100 Colombian women overcome the pain of domestic abuse, encouraging them to release their suffering into ceramic pots. (Time for a deep breath.) Her moving exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Galleryis on view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014.
The women, who range in age from 18 to 72, all have two things in common: they hail from Rumié’s native Cartagena de Indias, Columbia, and they’ve suffered greatly at the hands of callous men. Nothing can reverse a betrayal so intimate as domestic abuse. Nothing can undo it. But through art and personal reflection, Rumié aims to help these women heal and rise above. She crafted 100 white ceramic pots, one for each chosen victim, and in a series of communal exercizes—involving discussion circles and therapy—had them channel all the angst and dark emotions surrounding their abuse—pain, fear, regret, shame, distrust—and “exhale” them into the vessels. What were once simple clay pots suddenly become prisons for pain, and, in turn, liberation for former victims. “Divine breath,” indeed.
Once sealed and marked with each participants initials, the pots aided the women in letting go of the internal burdens associated with their suffering. Upon completion, each woman recieved a trinket female figurine of their choosing, made using traditional lost-wax methods.
32 of the charged pots are displayed during Rumié’s exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH, ornamented with intricate, golden metal designs that reflect the women whose pain they contain. A reception will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 9, from 6-8 p.m.
The beauty of the pots is undeniable. More beautiful yet is the personal healing that they helped bring about.
via
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
Ruby Rumie: HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Gallery. On view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014

What’s the first step in coping with a stressful or anxious experience? Breathing deeply.
The act is therapeutic. Inhale, then exhale, and a natural calm creeps in. Nerves settle down. Clear-headedness pervades. But just how powerful is this seemingly casual exercise? Artist Ruby Rumié would say incredibly so—so powerful, in fact, that she used the technique to help 100 Colombian women overcome the pain of domestic abuse, encouraging them to release their suffering into ceramic pots. (Time for a deep breath.) Her moving exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Galleryis on view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014.
The women, who range in age from 18 to 72, all have two things in common: they hail from Rumié’s native Cartagena de Indias, Columbia, and they’ve suffered greatly at the hands of callous men. Nothing can reverse a betrayal so intimate as domestic abuse. Nothing can undo it. But through art and personal reflection, Rumié aims to help these women heal and rise above. She crafted 100 white ceramic pots, one for each chosen victim, and in a series of communal exercizes—involving discussion circles and therapy—had them channel all the angst and dark emotions surrounding their abuse—pain, fear, regret, shame, distrust—and “exhale” them into the vessels. What were once simple clay pots suddenly become prisons for pain, and, in turn, liberation for former victims. “Divine breath,” indeed.
Once sealed and marked with each participants initials, the pots aided the women in letting go of the internal burdens associated with their suffering. Upon completion, each woman recieved a trinket female figurine of their choosing, made using traditional lost-wax methods.
32 of the charged pots are displayed during Rumié’s exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH, ornamented with intricate, golden metal designs that reflect the women whose pain they contain. A reception will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 9, from 6-8 p.m.
The beauty of the pots is undeniable. More beautiful yet is the personal healing that they helped bring about.
via
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
Ruby Rumie: HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Gallery. On view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014

What’s the first step in coping with a stressful or anxious experience? Breathing deeply.
The act is therapeutic. Inhale, then exhale, and a natural calm creeps in. Nerves settle down. Clear-headedness pervades. But just how powerful is this seemingly casual exercise? Artist Ruby Rumié would say incredibly so—so powerful, in fact, that she used the technique to help 100 Colombian women overcome the pain of domestic abuse, encouraging them to release their suffering into ceramic pots. (Time for a deep breath.) Her moving exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Galleryis on view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014.
The women, who range in age from 18 to 72, all have two things in common: they hail from Rumié’s native Cartagena de Indias, Columbia, and they’ve suffered greatly at the hands of callous men. Nothing can reverse a betrayal so intimate as domestic abuse. Nothing can undo it. But through art and personal reflection, Rumié aims to help these women heal and rise above. She crafted 100 white ceramic pots, one for each chosen victim, and in a series of communal exercizes—involving discussion circles and therapy—had them channel all the angst and dark emotions surrounding their abuse—pain, fear, regret, shame, distrust—and “exhale” them into the vessels. What were once simple clay pots suddenly become prisons for pain, and, in turn, liberation for former victims. “Divine breath,” indeed.
Once sealed and marked with each participants initials, the pots aided the women in letting go of the internal burdens associated with their suffering. Upon completion, each woman recieved a trinket female figurine of their choosing, made using traditional lost-wax methods.
32 of the charged pots are displayed during Rumié’s exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH, ornamented with intricate, golden metal designs that reflect the women whose pain they contain. A reception will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 9, from 6-8 p.m.
The beauty of the pots is undeniable. More beautiful yet is the personal healing that they helped bring about.
via
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
Ruby Rumie: HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Gallery. On view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014

What’s the first step in coping with a stressful or anxious experience? Breathing deeply.
The act is therapeutic. Inhale, then exhale, and a natural calm creeps in. Nerves settle down. Clear-headedness pervades. But just how powerful is this seemingly casual exercise? Artist Ruby Rumié would say incredibly so—so powerful, in fact, that she used the technique to help 100 Colombian women overcome the pain of domestic abuse, encouraging them to release their suffering into ceramic pots. (Time for a deep breath.) Her moving exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Galleryis on view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014.
The women, who range in age from 18 to 72, all have two things in common: they hail from Rumié’s native Cartagena de Indias, Columbia, and they’ve suffered greatly at the hands of callous men. Nothing can reverse a betrayal so intimate as domestic abuse. Nothing can undo it. But through art and personal reflection, Rumié aims to help these women heal and rise above. She crafted 100 white ceramic pots, one for each chosen victim, and in a series of communal exercizes—involving discussion circles and therapy—had them channel all the angst and dark emotions surrounding their abuse—pain, fear, regret, shame, distrust—and “exhale” them into the vessels. What were once simple clay pots suddenly become prisons for pain, and, in turn, liberation for former victims. “Divine breath,” indeed.
Once sealed and marked with each participants initials, the pots aided the women in letting go of the internal burdens associated with their suffering. Upon completion, each woman recieved a trinket female figurine of their choosing, made using traditional lost-wax methods.
32 of the charged pots are displayed during Rumié’s exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH, ornamented with intricate, golden metal designs that reflect the women whose pain they contain. A reception will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 9, from 6-8 p.m.
The beauty of the pots is undeniable. More beautiful yet is the personal healing that they helped bring about.
via
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
Ruby Rumie: HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Gallery. On view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014

What’s the first step in coping with a stressful or anxious experience? Breathing deeply.
The act is therapeutic. Inhale, then exhale, and a natural calm creeps in. Nerves settle down. Clear-headedness pervades. But just how powerful is this seemingly casual exercise? Artist Ruby Rumié would say incredibly so—so powerful, in fact, that she used the technique to help 100 Colombian women overcome the pain of domestic abuse, encouraging them to release their suffering into ceramic pots. (Time for a deep breath.) Her moving exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Galleryis on view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014.
The women, who range in age from 18 to 72, all have two things in common: they hail from Rumié’s native Cartagena de Indias, Columbia, and they’ve suffered greatly at the hands of callous men. Nothing can reverse a betrayal so intimate as domestic abuse. Nothing can undo it. But through art and personal reflection, Rumié aims to help these women heal and rise above. She crafted 100 white ceramic pots, one for each chosen victim, and in a series of communal exercizes—involving discussion circles and therapy—had them channel all the angst and dark emotions surrounding their abuse—pain, fear, regret, shame, distrust—and “exhale” them into the vessels. What were once simple clay pots suddenly become prisons for pain, and, in turn, liberation for former victims. “Divine breath,” indeed.
Once sealed and marked with each participants initials, the pots aided the women in letting go of the internal burdens associated with their suffering. Upon completion, each woman recieved a trinket female figurine of their choosing, made using traditional lost-wax methods.
32 of the charged pots are displayed during Rumié’s exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH, ornamented with intricate, golden metal designs that reflect the women whose pain they contain. A reception will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 9, from 6-8 p.m.
The beauty of the pots is undeniable. More beautiful yet is the personal healing that they helped bring about.
via
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
Ruby Rumie: HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Gallery. On view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014

What’s the first step in coping with a stressful or anxious experience? Breathing deeply.
The act is therapeutic. Inhale, then exhale, and a natural calm creeps in. Nerves settle down. Clear-headedness pervades. But just how powerful is this seemingly casual exercise? Artist Ruby Rumié would say incredibly so—so powerful, in fact, that she used the technique to help 100 Colombian women overcome the pain of domestic abuse, encouraging them to release their suffering into ceramic pots. (Time for a deep breath.) Her moving exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH at Nohra Haime Galleryis on view Sept. 10-Oct. 18, 2014.
The women, who range in age from 18 to 72, all have two things in common: they hail from Rumié’s native Cartagena de Indias, Columbia, and they’ve suffered greatly at the hands of callous men. Nothing can reverse a betrayal so intimate as domestic abuse. Nothing can undo it. But through art and personal reflection, Rumié aims to help these women heal and rise above. She crafted 100 white ceramic pots, one for each chosen victim, and in a series of communal exercizes—involving discussion circles and therapy—had them channel all the angst and dark emotions surrounding their abuse—pain, fear, regret, shame, distrust—and “exhale” them into the vessels. What were once simple clay pots suddenly become prisons for pain, and, in turn, liberation for former victims. “Divine breath,” indeed.
Once sealed and marked with each participants initials, the pots aided the women in letting go of the internal burdens associated with their suffering. Upon completion, each woman recieved a trinket female figurine of their choosing, made using traditional lost-wax methods.
32 of the charged pots are displayed during Rumié’s exhibit HÁLITO DIVINO—DIVINE BREATH, ornamented with intricate, golden metal designs that reflect the women whose pain they contain. A reception will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 9, from 6-8 p.m.
The beauty of the pots is undeniable. More beautiful yet is the personal healing that they helped bring about.
via
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
Читать дальше
Twitter
Одноклассники
Мой Мир

материал с tumblr.com

1

      Add

      You can create thematic collections and keep, for instance, all recipes in one place so you will never lose them.

      No images found
      Previous Next 0 / 0
      500
      • Advertisement
      • Animals
      • Architecture
      • Art
      • Auto
      • Aviation
      • Books
      • Cartoons
      • Celebrities
      • Children
      • Culture
      • Design
      • Economics
      • Education
      • Entertainment
      • Fashion
      • Fitness
      • Food
      • Gadgets
      • Games
      • Health
      • History
      • Hobby
      • Humor
      • Interior
      • Moto
      • Movies
      • Music
      • Nature
      • News
      • Photo
      • Pictures
      • Politics
      • Psychology
      • Science
      • Society
      • Sport
      • Technology
      • Travel
      • Video
      • Weapons
      • Web
      • Work
        Submit
        Valid formats are JPG, PNG, GIF.
        Not more than 5 Мb, please.
        30
        surfingbird.ru/site/
        RSS format guidelines
        500
        • Advertisement
        • Animals
        • Architecture
        • Art
        • Auto
        • Aviation
        • Books
        • Cartoons
        • Celebrities
        • Children
        • Culture
        • Design
        • Economics
        • Education
        • Entertainment
        • Fashion
        • Fitness
        • Food
        • Gadgets
        • Games
        • Health
        • History
        • Hobby
        • Humor
        • Interior
        • Moto
        • Movies
        • Music
        • Nature
        • News
        • Photo
        • Pictures
        • Politics
        • Psychology
        • Science
        • Society
        • Sport
        • Technology
        • Travel
        • Video
        • Weapons
        • Web
        • Work

          Submit

          Thank you! Wait for moderation.

          Тебе это не нравится?

          You can block the domain, tag, user or channel, and we'll stop recommend it to you. You can always unblock them in your settings.

          • myampgoesto11
          • домен myampgoesto11.tumblr.com
          • домен tumblr.com

          Get a link

          Спасибо, твоя жалоба принята.

          Log on to Surfingbird

          Recover
          Sign up

          or

          Welcome to Surfingbird.com!

          You'll find thousands of interesting pages, photos, and videos inside.
          Join!

          • Personal
            recommendations

          • Stash
            interesting and useful stuff

          • Anywhere,
            anytime

          Do we already know you? Login or restore the password.

          Close

          Add to collection

             

            Facebook

            Ваш профиль на рассмотрении, обновите страницу через несколько секунд

            Facebook

            К сожалению, вы не попадаете под условия акции