html текст
All interests
  • All interests
  • Design
  • Food
  • Gadgets
  • Humor
  • News
  • Photo
  • Travel
  • Video
Click to see the next recommended page
Like it
Don't like
Add to Favorites

24 Small New England Towns You Absolutely Need To Visit

Not the Woodstock you are probably thinking of, this small town in Vermont contains 3,200 residents spread among five even smaller villages and hamlets. But just because this isn’t the site of the infamous music festival doesn’t mean there aren’t a bunch of great sites to take in.

Where to stay: The Woodstock Inn & Resort, for rustic luxury; the Jackson House Inn, located just outside the heart of the village.
Where to eat: Bentley’s, for delicious food that makes the most of local Vermont ingredients like cheddar cheese; Mountain Creamery, for homemade ice cream; The Prince and the Pauper, located in the heart of Woodstock Village.
What to do: Stock up on fresh produce, meats, and more at the Woodstock Farmer’s Market; experience Vermont farm life at the Billings Farm & Museum; see live music, classic film, and more at the Woodstock Town Hall Theatre.

Block Island, located just over 10 miles off the southern coast of Rhode Island, has only one town — New Shoreham. While the main part of town is located right by the ferry terminal, you can rent bikes or Jeeps to travel all over the island. Though it only has about 1,000 year-round residents, Block Island welcomes up to 20,000 visitors a day during high season. Aside from one Ben & Jerry’s, the island is free of chain stores, meaning it is great for local shopping and dining.

Where to stay: The National Hotel, located in the main part of town; The Old Town Inn, a building originally constructed in 1825.
Where to eat: Winfield’s for an eclectic mix of cuisines; Finn’s Seafood for, naturally, seafood.
What to do: The main part of town is pretty small, so after walking around for a bit, you’ll want to get out to explore the rest of the island. There are two great lighthouses — one on the north part of the island, the other on the southeast; hike along parts, or all, of the 25 miles worth of walking trails for great views of the ocean.

You might recognize Rockport as one of the filming locations of the 2009 film The Proposal. Even if you don’t, this town of under 7,500 residents, stunning in its “quintessential New England seaside village” vibe, should be on your radar. Most people eschew northern Massachusetts in favor of Cape Cod, but Rockport proves why it’s definitely worth heading up from Boston.

Where to stay: Bearskin Neck Motor Lodge, for a location right on Rockport’s main drag; the Seafarer Inn for the B&B experience.
Where to eat: Top Dog for amazing hot dogs; any of the candy or ice cream shops along the Bearskin Neck drag.
What to do: Stroll up and down Bearskin Neck, a small area of land that juts into Rockport’s harbor, stopping in at all the small craft stores along the way; check out The Paper House, a home constructed from actual newspaper; listen to live music at the Shalin Liu Performance Center.

One of America’s original vacation playgrounds for the rich and famous, Newport still retains much of the luxurious charm that made it so appealing to earlier generations. But although the city is perhaps best known for its larger-than-life mansions, it packs plenty of classic New England character as well.

Where to stay: The Cliffside Inn, for a luxury bed and breakfast experience; The Chanler at Cliff Walk, to stay right near the city’s famous mansions.
Where to eat: Rosemary & Thyme, for European-style baked goods; Mooring Restaurant, for a twist on classic seafood and sandwiches.
What to do: Walk along the 3.5 mile Cliff Walk to take in the mansions, including the famed The Breakers; tennis fans should check out the International Tennis Hall of Fame; visit Touro Synagogue, the oldest Jewish house of worship in the United States.

Lying in the highest valley between New York and Montreal, Dorset is the perfect spot for a relaxing weekend. Dorset is known for having some of the oldest marble quarries in the country, providing marble to landmarks like the New York City Library. Though the quarries aren’t used as much anymore, they still make great swimming holes for the locals.

Where to stay: The Dorset Inn, a historic hotel that has been open for over 200 years.
Where to eat: Barrows House Restaurant, a gastropub within the Barrows House Inn; Mio Bistro, for Mediterranean-inspired food.
What to do: Wander the Dorset Farmer’s Market in search of fresh local goods; check out a show at the Dorset Playhouse.

OK, so this is kind of cheating, being a county and not a town. But although Berkshire County consists of numerous small municipalities (the largest, the city of Pittsfield, clocks in at under 50,000 residents), many consider “The Berkshires” to be a cohesive destination in and of itself. The area is known for its natural beauty, with gently rolling hills giving way to mountains for skiing, as well as a strong local arts scene.

Where to stay: The historic Red Lion Inn in Stockbridge.
Where to eat: Baba Louie’s (multiple locations) for pizza; Rouge, in West Stockbridge, for French cuisine; Chocolate Springs Café, in Lenox, for all kinds of desserts.
What to do: View the contemporary art at Mass MoCA in North Adams; watch dancers perform in a natural setting at Jacob’s Pillow in Becket; visit the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge and stroll around Main Street, which helped inspired some of Rockwell’s work.

Located on the northeastern shore of Martha’s Vineyard, the town of Oak Bluffs is one of the island’s main municipalities and a perfect spot from which to explore the rest of the island. The town is known for its unique, brightly colored “gingerbread cottages,” which give the area a fairytale feel.

Where to stay: Isabelle’s Beach House, located right on the waterfront; The Oak Bluffs Inn, located along the town’s main drag.
Where to eat: Nancy’s, which gives options for both a more upscale meal or a classic fried-seafood snack. Lookout Tavern, for seafood including sushi; Back Door Donuts, part of the Martha’s Vineyard Gourmet Café & Bakery, which offers fresh donuts and fritters late nights.
What to do: People watch in Ocean Park, surrounded by gingerbread cottages and across from the town beach; go shopping along Circuit Avenue, the town’s main street; relive your childhood at the Flying Horses Carousel, the oldest platform carousel in the country.

With just over 30,000 people, Falmouth is actually one of the largest towns on this list. It’s comprised of various villages, including Woods Hole, home to numerous marine science institutions that do research in the area. Unlike some of the more popular Cape towns, Falmouth is located on the lower part of the Cape — which gives you a whole different Cape experience.

Where to stay: Wood’s Hole Passage Bed & Breakfast Inn, for easy proximity to both Woods Hole and the center of Falmouth; the Captain’s Manor Inn, located in Falmouth’s historic district.
Where to eat: Añejo Mexican Bistro, for Mexican and a tequila bar; The Quarterdeck Restaurant, for seafood and steak.
What to do: Soak in the sun at Falmouth Heights Beach; see the sea creatures at the Woods Hole Science Aquarium; learn about the ocean’s complexities at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

First organized in the 17th century, the town of Guilford is replete with reminders of its historic past. With many colonial and Victorian homes still standing, architecture is just one of Guilford’s charms. There are various trails and parks where visitors can take in the sights of the Long Island Sound, along which Guilford is located.

Where to stay: Griswold Cottage, a tiny B&B where you can take cooking classes; the B&B at Bartlett Farm, with a farmhouse built in the late 1780s.
Where to eat: Bufalina, for delicious pizza; the Guilford Bistro, for Italian.
What to do: Scour the market at Bishop’s Orchards; walk around the town green, around which the town of Guilford was first settled; view the oldest stone house in New England at the Henry Whitfield State Museum.

Perhaps infamous for being the site of the Bush family’s summer compound, Kennebunkport is, in fact, much more than a destination for would-be political spies. With just around 3,500 residents, Kennebunkport may be small, but it is comprised of many different areas with different personalities — the Lower Village, which acts as a “downtown” in many ways, Cape Porpoise, a small fishing village, and Goose Rocks Beach, the town’s coastline.

Where to stay: The Nonantum Resort, for a larger resort experience; The Captain Lord Mansion, for a romantic getaway.
Where to eat: Alisson’s Restaurant, for casual seafood in the center of town; David’s KPT, for contemporary cuisine with a waterfront location; Pier 77 Restaurant or The Ramp Bar and Grill, for a more upscale or more casual experience, respectively, in the same building.
What to do: Relax in the sun, or walk along the three-mile stretch of sand, at Goose Rocks Beach; visit St. Ann’s Church, a stone church first built in 1887; learn about the history of trolleys and public transit at the Seashore Trolley Museum.

With just over 20,000 residents, Marblehead is actually one of the larger towns on this list. The town has enjoyed a long history as a fishing port, though now focuses more on yachting and boating in Marblehead Harbor. Due to its role in the Revolutionary War, the town claims the (disputed) title of Birthplace of the American Navy.

Where to stay: The Seagull Inn Bed & Breakfast, located on Marblehead Neck; Harborside House, for its views overlooking the harbor.
Where to eat: The Landing Restaurant, for food right on the water; Maddie’s Sail Loft, to eat surrounded by memorabilia commemorating the town’s fishing history; Jack-Tar, for a tavern experience with a twist.
What to do: Explore Fort Sewall, a historic fort used to defend against the British during revolutionary times; lay out on Devereux Beach, located along the sides of the narrow strip of land connecting the main town to Marblehead Neck; tour the Jeremiah Lee Mansion, built in 1768.

Situated at the far tip of Cape Cod, Provincetown is as far out as you can travel before there’s nowhere else to go. Provincetown is famed for being one of the most LGBT-friendly towns in the country, but it is much more than just that. Provincetown is a haven for the arts, especially, from theater to painting.

Where to stay: Boatslip Resort, a destination for LGBT travelers and home to the famous Tea Dance in summer; Carpe Diem Guesthouse, an adults-only spa resort for those looking for a grown-up vacation.
Where to eat: The Lobster Pot Restaurant, for seafood on the water; Joe Coffee and Café, for coffee and small bites; Ceraldi, if you’re willing to break the bank on a special meal.
What to do: Enjoy the sun at Race Point Beach; learn about the history of the Pilgrims and the town of Provincetown at the Pilgrim Monument & Provincetown Museum; walk up and down Commercial Street, checking out the shops and galleries along the way.

Читать дальше
Twitter
Одноклассники
Мой Мир

материал с buzzfeed.com

3

      Add

      You can create thematic collections and keep, for instance, all recipes in one place so you will never lose them.

      No images found
      Previous Next 0 / 0
      500
      • Advertisement
      • Animals
      • Architecture
      • Art
      • Auto
      • Aviation
      • Books
      • Cartoons
      • Celebrities
      • Children
      • Culture
      • Design
      • Economics
      • Education
      • Entertainment
      • Fashion
      • Fitness
      • Food
      • Gadgets
      • Games
      • Health
      • History
      • Hobby
      • Humor
      • Interior
      • Moto
      • Movies
      • Music
      • Nature
      • News
      • Photo
      • Pictures
      • Politics
      • Psychology
      • Science
      • Society
      • Sport
      • Technology
      • Travel
      • Video
      • Weapons
      • Web
      • Work
        Submit
        Valid formats are JPG, PNG, GIF.
        Not more than 5 Мb, please.
        30
        surfingbird.ru/site/
        RSS format guidelines
        500
        • Advertisement
        • Animals
        • Architecture
        • Art
        • Auto
        • Aviation
        • Books
        • Cartoons
        • Celebrities
        • Children
        • Culture
        • Design
        • Economics
        • Education
        • Entertainment
        • Fashion
        • Fitness
        • Food
        • Gadgets
        • Games
        • Health
        • History
        • Hobby
        • Humor
        • Interior
        • Moto
        • Movies
        • Music
        • Nature
        • News
        • Photo
        • Pictures
        • Politics
        • Psychology
        • Science
        • Society
        • Sport
        • Technology
        • Travel
        • Video
        • Weapons
        • Web
        • Work

          Submit

          Thank you! Wait for moderation.

          Тебе это не нравится?

          You can block the domain, tag, user or channel, and we'll stop recommend it to you. You can always unblock them in your settings.

          • buzzfeed.com
          • великобритания
          • домен buzzfeed.com

          Get a link

          Спасибо, твоя жалоба принята.

          Log on to Surfingbird

          Recover
          Sign up

          or

          Welcome to Surfingbird.com!

          You'll find thousands of interesting pages, photos, and videos inside.
          Join!

          • Personal
            recommendations

          • Stash
            interesting and useful stuff

          • Anywhere,
            anytime

          Do we already know you? Login or restore the password.

          Close

          Add to collection

             

            Facebook

            Ваш профиль на рассмотрении, обновите страницу через несколько секунд

            Facebook

            К сожалению, вы не попадаете под условия акции