html текст
All interests
  • All interests
  • Design
  • Food
  • Gadgets
  • Humor
  • News
  • Photo
  • Travel
  • Video
Click to see the next recommended page
Like it
Don't like
Add to Favorites

"Dial down the feminism" creator Alex Bertulis-Fernandes on the aftermath of going viral

Alex-bertulis-fernandes_dial-down-the-feminism_opinion-advertising-art-itsnicethat

After a particularly poignant comment from a tutor in class, student creative and writer Alex Bertulis-Fernandes made a piece in response that ended up going viral on Twitter. Her artwork, Dial Down The Feminism, was featured in The Guardian, Dazed, Newsweek and Time, and prompted a barrage of online commentary. So what happens when something you create goes viral, and what is it like to experience the aftermath, long after the Twitter world has moved on? We spoke to Alex to find out her perspective.

First off could you explain what happened?
I was in my final term of my foundation diploma in art and design, where you work on a personal project. I was interested in looking at the intersection between art and advertising, and how that can be used to advocate for social change. My tutor and I were talking about my idea to do something around the recent revelations around Harvey Weinstein and sexual misconduct in Hollywood, and he suggested I maybe dial down the feminism a bit. 

What was it about the work that he reacted to?
One of my pieces was a tribute to the Guerrilla Girls, The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist (1988). I did a version that was The Advantages of Being a Hollywood Actress. My art class is predominantly female, and a lot of the work can feature feminist themes, in sheer virtue of the way we experience the world. It’s an issue for us. For a lot of men, feminism is something they can choose to engage with, whereas for most women I know, whether they call it feminism or not, it’s something that directly affects them if they feel they’re not being treated equally.

What was your reaction to your tutor’s comment?
I went home and thought about it for a while. I wasn’t horrified – I know that teacher and he’s always been slightly provocative, but I was exasperated by the comment. So I decided to create something in response to it.

I’d been to the Mother London Not for Sale exhibition of their non-commercial work a few weeks earlier. I loved pieces like the Free the Feed campaign, where they used a giant nipple to try and normalise breastfeeding in public. I’d already started thinking about how I might use physical objects in my work. When I was thinking about the phrase my teacher used, I found myself fixating on the word “dial”, and wondering whether I could actually make a dial. I began to think, if there were a feminist dial, what would it look like? I decided to mock one up. I remembered a phrase “complicit in my own dehumanisation”, used by musician Kathleen Hanna, and placed it on one side of the dial. On the other side of the dial I put the phrase “raging feminist”, because that seems to be the general perception of feminism – one of anger. Although I don’t like the assumption that every feminist is perpetually angry, why wouldn’t we be, when we don’t have equality? I wanted my piece to reclaim the term “raging feminist”.

Tell us what happened next, and why you think the piece resonated online.
I put it on Twitter, because we’re encouraged to share our work, and it went viral. I think there were a few things at play. Firstly, I think the message of the piece resonated with women. Many women know what it’s like to be in a situation in which you’re encouraged to be “less feminist” or “dial it down” in some way – “it” being whatever isn’t considered palatable to those around you. I also shared this piece at a time in which feminism is becoming more mainstream, and we’re learning more and more about how pervasive gender inequality is, even in the western world. So it was quite timely in that respect.

I do think posting the story behind it helped. People love it, especially on Twitter, if anyone’s perceived as being vaguely disrespectful of authority. People love a clapback. It’s simple, and quick and easy to “get” and maybe that’s stemmed from my interest in advertising. My older work would’ve been more text-heavy and complicated. This is stripped back, which helps on social media, where everything is so immediate.

What’s been the good and bad of the reaction online?
The good has been having so many people engage with my work. I’ve been sharing stuff online sporadically over the past few years and got maybe 50 likes, max. It’s difficult to put yourself out there online, you question yourself all the time. So this response has been amazing. People have written to me, and publications like Newsweek interviewed me, and that blew my mind. Plus Mark Ruffalo retweeted it which was surreal. I’m happy it happened, and I’ve been offered opportunities off the back of it. It was featured in Airbnb’s International Women’s Day showcase, and was commissioned by The Sunday Times Style for IWD too. 

I live with anxiety, and my biggest fear in life is disappointing people. Before this happened, whenever I felt anxious I would fall back on the fact it was only a small audience that could be disappointed. So while having a bigger following has been amazing, it’s magnified the pressure and that’s difficult. I’ve had lots of requests for T-shirts, and I want to please as many people as possible with the design and sourcing. The anxiety is something I’m learning to manage; it’s a learning curve. I’ve shared work since then that’s received a lot more attention than it would’ve done before, but not as much as the dial. It makes me wonder, is the new work not as good? Have a peaked already at 23?! Ultimately though it’s been positive.

How did your tutor react to the whole episode?
I showed him the piece before I put it on Twitter. He liked it, he tends to like work that’s provocative or funny. Some people online saw it as a slap in the face to him, whereas he didn’t at all. Once it went viral I think he was a bit nervous, as you would be, but he’s been very supportive. I was lucky in that I never felt I’d be penalised for doing the opposite of what he suggested. Still, I would have made the piece anyway, even if I hadn’t known he’d be okay with it. If you can’t be true to yourself in your art, where can you be?

Alex was part of D&AD’s New Blood Shift London’s class of 2017 , an intense night school providing training and opportunities for young creatives without degrees to break into the industry, and is currently undertaking placements at various agencies and studios. The image of the dial is credited to Matt Gentile of Icon Deposit.

Smorgasbord-wihayo-soju-dylan-griffith-alcohol-packaging-graphic-design-itsnicethat-illustration-for-brand-film-list Work / Opinion Looking east: how Smörgåsbord designed a soju brand to work in Europe and Asia alike

Earlier this month, Coca-Cola announced it would produce its first ever alcoholic drink, an alco-pop to be launched solely in Japan. The idea is to tap into the lucrative market for chu-hi, canned fizzy drinks given a kick with a local spirit called shochu. The world’s largest soft drinks company making its move into this sector is significant, and symbolic of many other western brands trying their luck in the Asian alcohol world where huge brands such as Asahi, Kirin and Suntory already have a presence. But how do you design the branding and packaging for a product aimed at a firmly established market on the other side of the world, as well as back home? Here to enlighten us is Dylan Griffith, co-founder of Cardiff and Amsterdam-based design studio Smörgåsbord, which recently collaborated on the creation of the first European-made soju, Wihayo.

Pregnant_in_the_creative_industry_opinion_international_womens_day_itsnicethat2 Work / International Women's Day What I learned, and worried about, as a pregnant woman in the creative industry

I was never the type of woman to daydream about pushing around a pram. I guess I assumed I would one day, but that vision was in the back of my mind, far overshadowed by ambitions for my career. Since I graduated nearly ten years ago, my priority had been work – I was lucky to have very supportive parents and friends who believed, probably more than me sometimes, that I could be successful. I feel good about where I am now, as news editor at It’s Nice That. I had to fight some pretty awful bosses along the way, one who described me as having “sharp elbows” (if I were a guy that would translate as “ambitious” but that’s a whole other subject); another with an approach to gender equality like that of Sterling Cooper. But it made me tough and I gained respect. Until I got to my late 20s and the comments started coming. Subtle, seemingly harmless jokey comments from family, friends and colleagues that most women around 30 in long-term relationships would recognise. It’s baby time. If you don’t have your usual G&T at the pub, eyes flicker with gleeful suspicion. People outrightly ask you if you want to have kids, like it’s not a hugely personal and weighted life decision that will change everything.

List Features / International Women's Day “We need everyone to wake up.” Google’s Tea Uglow on intersectionality in the creative industries

Tea Uglow is the creative director at Google’s Creative Lab in Sydney. She works with both cultural and creative organisations across the globe exploring the space between technology and the arts and what can happen when they intersect. Her impressive output spans everything from responsive and reactive reading interfaces to immersive, 360-degree performances. She is also a transgender woman. To celebrate International Women’s Day, It’s Nice That got in touch with Tea to find out her opinions on representation and intersectionality within the creative industries.

She_says_list_img Media Partnership / Design Indaba Why Design Thinking is bullshit

For the fifth consecutive year, It’s Nice That has media partnered with Design Indaba. We will be delivering news, interviews and insight live and direct from each day of the three-day conference in Cape Town. The event will be live broadcast via simulcast to a number of South African cities allowing each presentation to resonate around the country.

List Work / Photography Adelaide Ivanova's photography blurs the boundaries between fact and fiction

Brazilian artist Adelaide Ivanova’s website quotes Susan Sontag’s book Regarding the Pain of Others, which criticises humanity’s relationship with war photography for turning death into an artistic object. It is unsurprising then that Adelaide’s series Direction Paris saw the artist interviewing Spanish Civil War survivors, photographing them and compiling her images alongside archival footage. Direction Paris is Adelaide’s personal exploration of humanity’s relationship to war.

Laura-csocsan-graphic-design-itsnicethat-list Work / Graphic Design Laura Csocsan's monochromatic portfolio of conceptual yet methodical and logical designs

“Generally, in every project, the use of type is important for me,” states Budapest-based graphic designer Laura Csocsan. “I usually find the best version of something always includes simple forms or an image, combined with type and the smart use of white space.” A quick look through Laura’s portfolio confirms her description of her work, as it’s one packed full of monochromatic, type-heavy projects born from her conceptual, yet methodical and logical approach to design.

Felipedipoitamargo-thelongandlonesomeroadtograndmas-animation-itsnicethat-list Work / Animation Meet the hilarious Felipe Di Poi Tamargo who has been animating since he was just a kid using Flash

Felipe Di Poi Tamargo started making animations when he was 11 years old. 11 years old! The age when most kids are just watching cartoons, Felipe was actually making them. He’s not 11 anymore though and with a number of years in the game, a degree from Rhode Island School of Design/Brown University’s dual programme, and a few Vimeo staff picks under his belt, it’s safe to say we expect great things from him.

Kelly-anna-nike-free-run-its-nice-that Work / Product Design "London is often seen as a grey city, but I have always seen it in colour" — illustrator Kelly Anna on designing Nike rns

“Running is more than a sport. It’s an act of freedom,” so say Nike. For the SS18 Nike Free Rn campaign, the brand teamed up with a crew of artists to explore what freedom feels and looks like. Top of the list is Kelly Anna, a London-based illustrator whose career we have been championing since we encountered her boldly brilliant work early last year, even inviting her to talk at Nicer Tuesdays.

Manujawaldia-illustration-itsnicethat-listlist Work / Illustration “I like drawing women nurturing one another and building things together": illustrator Manuja Waldia

Manuja Waldia’s vibrant illustrations span a wide range of subjects from Shakespeare to self-love. After graduating from university with a degree in communication design, the Portland-based illustrator has produced impressive work for a number of mega-brands; Manuja created a Google doodle to commemorate the Indian singer Begum Akhtar on her 103rd birthday, she designed dainty Indianapolis city maps for PrintText and continues to illustrate the book covers for Pelican’s Shakespeare series. Her signature style can be seen on search engines and bookshelves alike, but it is Manuja’s personal work that really caught our eye. Focusing on female empowerment and the importance of sisterhood, Manuja’s self-initiated illustrations are populated by elegant figures that clearly understand the meaning of feminism.

Fontsmith-fsindustrie-graphicdesign-itsnicethat-list Sponsored / Graphic Design Fontsmith releases its ambitious typeface, FS Industrie, available in 70 variants

London-based type foundry Fontsmith has released its most ambitious typeface to date, FS Industrie. Designed around five different widths and seven different weights, there is a total of 70 variants including italics to play with. “We are on the cusp of a new age in digital typeface design,” says Fontsmith’s type design director Phil Garnham on the new release, “where the ability to vary a font’s weight and width axis offers limitless possibilities to graphic designers within any given space.”

Boriscamaca-photography-itsnicethat-14list Work / Photography Boris Camaca's eerie, otherworldly photographs are rooted in social criticism

You may scoff at the idea that the world is being run by a group of undercover reptiles, but in photographer Boris Camaca’s world, this isn’t far from the truth. His series Reptiles documents a family of lizard-human hybrids lounging around their plush villa in effortlessly stylish clothes. “The idea came from London-based stylist and creative genius Hamish Wirgman. He presented two ideas; one was about time travel and the other was about a group of dinosaur-like people. We opted for the dino concept and built up a story about a family that mutates in order to prolong their lives,” Boris tells It’s Nice That.

Antoine-elsensohn-graphic-design-itsnicethat-list-alt Work / Graphic Design Designer Antoine Elsensohn uses simple graphic elements to allow "fonts to express themselves"

“Over time, I think I can qualify my work as ‘simple’ in shapes, colours or layouts,” Paris-based graphic designer, Antoine Elsensohn tells It’s Nice That. “However, I always give typography the principal role.” With a website that seems to offer an infinite scroll of delectable typefaces, compelling book covers and down-right great designs, Antoine’s work had us sold pretty quickly.

Nachoalegre-photography-itsnicethat-14list Work / Photography Fashion photographer Nacho Alegre's tribute to 30 years of Spanish Vogue

Barcelona-based fashion photographer, Nacho Alegre, is best known for his still lives. Whether it’s bathroom accessories, potatoes or sellotape, Nacho has a way of transforming mundane objects into striking, inventive sculptures. For his latest shoot, the Spanish photographer was asked to capture a series of images to mark the 30th anniversary of Spanish Vogue. Eugenia de la Torriente, Vogue España’s editor-in-chief, wanted Nacho to draw inspiration from the magazine’s first issue in 1988. “There was a very nice story that was loosely based on Spanish culture so we stuck to that,” Nacho, who is also the editor, founder and creative director of Apartamento magazine, tells It’s Nice That.

Sweetdatapoint-therodina-graphicdesign-itsnicethat-1 Work / Graphic Design "Hard, refreshing and awkward": The Rodina design studio on their bizarre creations

From performance art and experience design to interactive websites and installations, The Rodina design studio can do it all. Tereza Ruller, The Rodina’s founder, splits her time between commissioned work and personal experiments and manages to bring equal levels of creative inventiveness to both. “The Rodina explores ways in which knowledge, experiences and relationships are produced and preserved. I am interested in the connections between culture, technology and aesthetics. Adopting interdisciplinary approaches allows The Rodina to examine the thousands of micro-interactions that occur between these fields,” Tereza tells It’s Nice That.

March-things-regulars-itsnicethat-list Regulars / Things From guidebooks to t-shirts to type specimens: it's March Things!

It’s Nice That has been on a long Easter-weekend break but we’re officially back and ready to share some of the Things you sent through our letterbox over the past month. Although London was blasted by the “beast from the east,” it, luckily, didn’t put a stop to the post.

Productiontype-mars-graphicdesign-itsnicethat-list Work / Graphic Design “Flexed and stiff at first sight": Alaric Garnier's first commercial font release, Mars

It’s not often we get to describe a typeface as fizzing with energy but Mars, the first commercial font release by designer Alaric Garnier released via Paris-based digital type agency Production Type, is exactly that. Surrounded by references to sports and the vitality needed to complete them, Mars is a duo of a typeface: a dynamic one consisting of “a pumped-up extended style and slimmer condensed,” iteration.

Diary_april_724x474 Regulars / Diary April diary: this month’s must-see events and exhibitions

Spring is here and with it comes a fresh crop of events, shows and exhibitions to inspire and fascinate. From immersive Abba to computer-generated Ian Cheng simulations and classic Yokoyama Taikan paintings, there’s something for all tastes. The It’s Nice That team has hand-picked five in the UK and five elsewhere around the world, to help you plan your cultural month ahead.h3. Glasgow International
20 April – 7 May 2018
Various venues, Glasgow

Final Regulars / Miscellaneous It's Nice That's Easter Break

We’ve got four days off! It’s the Easter Bank Holiday so we’ll be out of the studio, having a bit of rest and probably sheltering from the rain rather than walking around in the spring sunshine we’d hoped for. Even though we won’t be around to update you over the next few days, to keep you entertained we’ve chosen not only the most read articles from 2018 so far, but some of our personal favourites. From discipline-spanning long-reads to the finest graphic design, photography, illustration and animation, the team have hand-picked the articles we’re still thinking about months later for you to enjoy again.

Listswims-in-january Work / Illustration Illustrator Amber Vittoria on her "natural and noisy" aesthetic evolution

Since we last spoke to New York-based illustrator Amber Vittoria in January 2017, she’s picked up some big clients. Creating colourful, blocky and hairy-legged figures for the likes of Teen Vogue, The New York Times and Instagram, the stream of work has been bountiful enough that Amber is also celebrating going freelance full-time this year. Over this period Amber’s illustration style has also evolved. “I realised most of my work began to strive for an unrealistic perfection, taking hours to ensure every line was exact,” Amber tells It’s Nice That. “Allowing for more natural, noisy linework within my pieces feels more honest not only to my themes of portraying woman through a woman’s lens but also myself as an artist.”

Zett-graphicdesign-itsnicethat-1list Work / Graphic Design Zett is the slick Zurich-based university paper for and about aspiring students

Think back to your student paper. If yours was anything like ours, it’s likely to have been a tired and typo-filled newspaper-wannabe. This, however, isn’t the case for the students of Zurich University of the Arts (otherwise known as Zürcher Hochschule der Künste or ZHdK). Zett, the ZHdK’s biannual art publication, is designed by four visual communication students – Michel Egger, Dominik Junker, Aurelia Peter and Silvan Possa – and functions as a printed version of the university’s online art and culture media platform. Following a redesign in 2016, Zett is a clean, slick and accomplished piece of work that consistently adapts according to its content. The magazine showcases a variety of student work, from photography to design, as well as student portraits and upcoming events.

Читать дальше
Twitter
Одноклассники
Мой Мир

материал с itsnicethat.com

1

      Add

      You can create thematic collections and keep, for instance, all recipes in one place so you will never lose them.

      No images found
      Previous Next 0 / 0
      500
      • Advertisement
      • Animals
      • Architecture
      • Art
      • Auto
      • Aviation
      • Books
      • Cartoons
      • Celebrities
      • Children
      • Culture
      • Design
      • Economics
      • Education
      • Entertainment
      • Fashion
      • Fitness
      • Food
      • Gadgets
      • Games
      • Health
      • History
      • Hobby
      • Humor
      • Interior
      • Moto
      • Movies
      • Music
      • Nature
      • News
      • Photo
      • Pictures
      • Politics
      • Psychology
      • Science
      • Society
      • Sport
      • Technology
      • Travel
      • Video
      • Weapons
      • Web
      • Work
        Submit
        Valid formats are JPG, PNG, GIF.
        Not more than 5 Мb, please.
        30
        surfingbird.ru/site/
        RSS format guidelines
        500
        • Advertisement
        • Animals
        • Architecture
        • Art
        • Auto
        • Aviation
        • Books
        • Cartoons
        • Celebrities
        • Children
        • Culture
        • Design
        • Economics
        • Education
        • Entertainment
        • Fashion
        • Fitness
        • Food
        • Gadgets
        • Games
        • Health
        • History
        • Hobby
        • Humor
        • Interior
        • Moto
        • Movies
        • Music
        • Nature
        • News
        • Photo
        • Pictures
        • Politics
        • Psychology
        • Science
        • Society
        • Sport
        • Technology
        • Travel
        • Video
        • Weapons
        • Web
        • Work

          Submit

          Thank you! Wait for moderation.

          Тебе это не нравится?

          You can block the domain, tag, user or channel, and we'll stop recommend it to you. You can always unblock them in your settings.

          • itsnicethat
          • домен itsnicethat.com

          Get a link

          Спасибо, твоя жалоба принята.

          Log on to Surfingbird

          Recover
          Sign up

          or

          Welcome to Surfingbird.com!

          You'll find thousands of interesting pages, photos, and videos inside.
          Join!

          • Personal
            recommendations

          • Stash
            interesting and useful stuff

          • Anywhere,
            anytime

          Do we already know you? Login or restore the password.

          Close

          Add to collection

             

            Facebook

            Ваш профиль на рассмотрении, обновите страницу через несколько секунд

            Facebook

            К сожалению, вы не попадаете под условия акции